2017

Architizer A+ Awards

Hospitality, Hotels & Resorts - Finalist

2015

Gourmet Traveller

Regional Hotel of the Year

2015

API Excellence in Property Awards

Heritage Property Award (Tasmania)

2015

API Excellence in Property Awards

Property Development Award (Tasmania)

2015

Tasmanian Architecture Awards

Commercial Architecture

Location

Lake St Clair, Tasmania

Client

Pumphouse Point

Year

2014

Images

Adam Gibson, Sharyn Cairns, Brook Holm

Land of

leeawuleena

Team

Peter Walker

Todd Henderson

Chris Roberts

Liz Walsh

Guy Edwards

+

Gandy & Roberts Consulting Engineers

TBS Engineering

Castellan Consulting

Vipac

Green Building Surveyors

RED Sustainability Consultants

Mean Con

Lake St Clair’s indigenous name is leeawuleena, meaning ‘sleeping water’. Gaze from floor-to-ceiling windows over the deepest lake in Australia and you really sense the mystery of it all. When natural surroundings speak such volumes, our design aimed to whisper, not shout. By carefully adapting the building in line with World Heritage Area best practice, we hope to offer environmental stewardship and enhance this iconic property for generations to come.

Focussed on sustainability and minimal site impact, we constructed 18 new guest suites within the existing building envelopes. Our initial briefing was clear: ‘don’t muck up the architecture’. So we didn’t. The concrete structure is untouched, its distressed state a remarkable testament to the harsh environment. We sought to magnify the contrast between the inviting interiors and gruff exterior. Yet if you remove the interior timber framework, you’d never know accommodation had ever been there. 

Think of the Pumphouse like a Neoclassical temple out in the middle of the lake. Anticipation builds as you walk along the concrete pier, surrounded by humbling mountains and water. We designed the 12 suites to run lengthways down the two outer wings of the building, with a communal lounge at the centre. This way, the same sightline from the pier approach goes all the way through the building.

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Pumphouse

Point

A pier, a pumphouse and the hypnotic pull of Lake St Clair.

Suspended over the mirrored and mercurial Lake St Clair, sleep with the sense you’re floating on water. Here you’ll find two heritage-listed buildings turned accommodation escape.

Deep in the wilderness, amidst dramatic mountains and dense rainforest, the two art deco buildings had sat unoccupied for 20 years. The three-storey Pumphouse was constructed in the 1940s as part of the hydroelectric scheme. Its only connection to land is a 250m concrete flume, at the end of which you’ll find the Shorehouse. Our adaptive reuse design offers retreat amidst alpine, life-affirming surrounds.

Nature and nurture

Lake St Clair’s indigenous name is leeawuleena, meaning ‘sleeping water’. Gaze from floor-to-ceiling windows over the deepest lake in Australia and you really sense the mystery of it all. When natural surroundings speak such volumes, our design aimed to whisper, not shout. By carefully adapting the building in line with World Heritage Area best practice, we hope to offer environmental stewardship and enhance this iconic property for generations to come.

Focussed on sustainability and minimal site impact, we constructed 18 new guest suites within the existing building envelopes. Our initial briefing was clear: ‘don’t muck up the architecture’. So we didn’t. The concrete structure is untouched, its distressed state a remarkable testament to the harsh environment. We sought to magnify the contrast between the inviting interiors and gruff exterior. Yet if you remove the interior timber framework, you’d never know accommodation had ever been there. 

Think of the Pumphouse like a Neoclassical temple out in the middle of the lake. Anticipation builds as you walk along the concrete pier, surrounded by humbling mountains and water. We designed the 12 suites to run lengthways down the two outer wings of the building, with a communal lounge at the centre. This way, the same sightline from the pier approach goes all the way through the building.

Escape the elements

Here, guests retreat into rugged simplicity and uncomplicated comfort. Our design uses a simple neutral colour palette and local Tasmanian timber. And it gradually welcomes visitors into more refined surroundings as they escape an invigorating battering from the Tasmanian elements. 

The entry and common space’s untreated rough-sawn hardwood and exposed servicing pipework subtly gives way to more refined stained and smoothed timber panelling and exposed bent copper plumbing in the suites. These touches also nod to the Pumphouse’s original purpose. Thanks to exposed pipework, when a visitor uses their bathroom it recreates the sense of water rushing through the building as it did decades ago.

With Lake St Clair’s consistent temperature and the existing concrete’s thermal mass, the Pumphouse and Shorehouse rely on natural ventilation and localised heating. This meant we could forego traditional homogeneous approaches in favour of different strategies, like crackling wood fires in common spaces and customisable panel heaters in the suites. It also allows for a gentle transition between the bracing outdoors and the sanctuary-style bliss of the suites.

Where human doings become human beings

Without lavish resource, we created a retreat well-suited to its rugged surrounds. Along the way, we were enriched with a deeper understanding of both hospitality and heritage whilst we overcame hurdles without breaking stride. Yet it would be remiss not to say that the most striking elements are of course, nothing to do with us at all. In that, we’ll remain forever in awe of the incomparable Lake St Clair.

PUMPHOUSE POINT

A pier, a pumphouse and the hypnotic pull of Lake St Clair.

Suspended over the mirrored and mercurial Lake St Clair, sleep with the sense you’re floating on water. Here you’ll find two heritage-listed buildings turned accommodation escape.

Deep in the wilderness, amidst dramatic mountains and dense rainforest, the two art deco buildings had sat unoccupied for 20 years. The three-storey Pumphouse was constructed in the 1940s as part of the hydroelectric scheme. Its only connection to land is a 250m concrete flume, at the end of which you’ll find the Shorehouse. Our adaptive reuse design offers retreat amidst alpine, life-affirming surrounds.

Lake St Clair’s indigenous name is leeawuleena, meaning ‘sleeping water’. Gaze from floor-to-ceiling windows over the deepest lake in Australia and you really sense the mystery of it all. When natural surroundings speak such volumes, our design aimed to whisper, not shout. By carefully adapting the building in line with World Heritage Area best practice, we hope to offer environmental stewardship and enhance this iconic property for generations to come.

Focussed on sustainability and minimal site impact, we constructed 18 new guest suites within the existing building envelopes. Our initial briefing was clear: ‘don’t muck up the architecture’. So we didn’t. The concrete structure is untouched, its distressed state a remarkable testament to the harsh environment. We sought to magnify the contrast between the inviting interiors and gruff exterior. Yet if you remove the interior timber framework, you’d never know accommodation had ever been there. 

Think of the Pumphouse like a Neoclassical temple out in the middle of the lake. Anticipation builds as you walk along the concrete pier, surrounded by humbling mountains and water. We designed the 12 suites to run lengthways down the two outer wings of the building, with a communal lounge at the centre. This way, the same sightline from the pier approach goes all the way through the building.

2017

Architizer A+ Awards

Hospitality, Hotels & Resorts - Finalist

2015

Gourmet Traveller

Regional Hotel of the Year

2015

API Excellence in Property Awards

Heritage Property Award (Tasmania)

2015

API Excellence in Property Awards

Property Development Award (Tasmania)

2015

Tasmanian Architecture Awards

Commercial Architecture

Location

Lake St Clair, Tasmania

Client

Pumphouse Point

Year

2014

Images

Adam Gibson, Sharyn Cairns

Land of

leeawuleena

Team

Peter Walker

Todd Henderson

Chris Roberts

Liz Walsh

Guy Edwards

+

Gandy & Roberts Consulting Engineers

TBS Engineering

Castellan Consulting

Vipac

Green Building Surveyors

RED Sustainability Consultants

Mean Con

Nature and nurture

Lake St Clair’s indigenous name is leeawuleena, meaning ‘sleeping water’. Gaze from floor-to-ceiling windows over the deepest lake in Australia and you really sense the mystery of it all. When natural surroundings speak such volumes, our design aimed to whisper, not shout. By carefully adapting the building in line with World Heritage Area best practice, we hope to offer environmental stewardship and enhance this iconic property for generations to come.

Focussed on sustainability and minimal site impact, we constructed 18 new guest suites within the existing building envelopes. Our initial briefing was clear: ‘don’t muck up the architecture’. So we didn’t. The concrete structure is untouched, its distressed state a remarkable testament to the harsh environment. We sought to magnify the contrast between the inviting interiors and gruff exterior. Yet if you remove the interior timber framework, you’d never know accommodation had ever been there. 

Think of the Pumphouse like a Neoclassical temple out in the middle of the lake. Anticipation builds as you walk along the concrete pier, surrounded by humbling mountains and water. We designed the 12 suites to run lengthways down the two outer wings of the building, with a communal lounge at the centre. This way, the same sightline from the pier approach goes all the way through the building.

Escape the elements

Here, guests retreat into rugged simplicity and uncomplicated comfort. Our design uses a simple neutral colour palette and local Tasmanian timber. And it gradually welcomes visitors into more refined surroundings as they escape an invigorating battering from the Tasmanian elements. 

The entry and common space’s untreated rough-sawn hardwood and exposed servicing pipework subtly gives way to more refined stained and smoothed timber panelling and exposed bent copper plumbing in the suites. These touches also nod to the Pumphouse’s original purpose. Thanks to exposed pipework, when a visitor uses their bathroom it recreates the sense of water rushing through the building as it did decades ago.

With Lake St Clair’s consistent temperature and the existing concrete’s thermal mass, the Pumphouse and Shorehouse rely on natural ventilation and localised heating. This meant we could forego traditional homogeneous approaches in favour of different strategies, like crackling wood fires in common spaces and customisable panel heaters in the suites. It also allows for a gentle transition between the bracing outdoors and the sanctuary-style bliss of the suites.

Where human doings become human beings

Without lavish resource, we created a retreat well-suited to its rugged surrounds. Along the way, we were enriched with a deeper understanding of both hospitality and heritage whilst we overcame hurdles without breaking stride. Yet it would be remiss not to say that the most striking elements are of course, nothing to do with us at all. In that, we’ll remain forever in awe of the incomparable Lake St Clair.