2020

Tasmanian Architecture Awards

Commercial Architecture - Commendation

Location

Launceston, Tasmania

Client

Stillwater

Year

2019

Images

Anjie Blair

Land of

Stoney Creek Nation

Team

Todd Henderson

Gary Fleming

Matt Green

Amanda York

+

Anstie Construction

JMG

Rare Innovation

John Papworth

Southern Lighting

Stillwater

Seven

Rising from the ashes. A nod to the post-fire regeneration of the Australian bush.

From fire and wild weather comes reconstruction, regeneration and rebirth. Within the charred, weathered framework of an 1830s flour mill we introduced elements of the unexpected in this boutique accommodation. It’s luxury with rusted, raw edges. And it threads the building’s rich heritage into a contemporary experience.

At the crossing of Launceston’s north and south Esk rivers lies 200 years of Tasmanian history. Miraculously, this flour mill survived a major structural fire and almost two centuries of exposure to wild elements. The mill is now home to award-winning restaurant, Stillwater. Stillwater enlisted our help to reclaim the top floors and vacant ancillary spaces of this historic building with seven new suites. Each was to offer an experience matching Stillwater’s engaging locavore concept.

Through fire and water

Design within this partially burnt timber framework proved the kind of constraint that conjured innovation. As an ambitious adaptive reuse project, it involved a commitment to preserve the building’s integrity and ideate with sensitivity to the original fabric. The existing framework gave us a richer narrative territory than new features ever could.

Our design delved into the post-fire regeneration seen in the Australian bush, known to produce vibrant new plant life. We opted for tactile finishes that yearned to be touched. Textural paintwork in deep reds and greens matched raw edged interiors. For the immersive bathrooms, we surprised guests with pinks, greens, elevated ceilings and playful lighting.

Something old, something new

With such an unassuming, utilitarian exterior, we invited guests to engage and explore their offbeat suite from the moment they opened the door.

Flickers into the mill’s past include surviving elements like weathered corrugated iron, heritage sandstone and giant oregon trusses. To focus on these interesting signs of age, we reused original materials wherever possible.

Consistent with the local, seasonal focus of the restaurant below, we celebrated the strength of Tasmanian products and designers. Guests sink into custom made A.H Beard beds and bespoke furniture designed and made by Simon Ancher at his nearby Launceston studio.

Looking back

It feels good to reflect on how we managed to fit seven suites into the 3D jigsaw puzzle of the flour mill. And as always, we learned along the way. It was surprising how impactful the rooms with the smaller windows were. We thought they might feel too dark, but the lower light actually created a sense of intimacy, really drawing you to the view. It’s a humbling experience to work with a great client and builder towards a shared goal and give new life to a significant part of local history.

STILLWATER SEVEN

Rising from the ashes. A nod to the post-fire regeneration of the Australian bush.

From fire and wild weather comes reconstruction, regeneration and rebirth. Within the charred, weathered framework of an 1830s flour mill we introduced elements of the unexpected in this boutique accommodation. It’s luxury with rusted, raw edges. And it threads the building’s rich heritage into a contemporary experience.

At the crossing of Launceston’s north and south Esk rivers lies 200 years of Tasmanian history. Miraculously, this flour mill survived a major structural fire and almost two centuries of exposure to wild elements. The mill is now home to award-winning restaurant, Stillwater. Stillwater enlisted our help to reclaim the top floors and vacant ancillary spaces of this historic building with seven new suites. Each was to offer an experience matching Stillwater’s engaging locavore concept.

2020

Tasmanian Architecture Awards

Commercial Architecture - Commendation

Location

Launceston, Tasmania

Client

Stillwater

Year

2019

Images

Anjie Blair

Land of

Stoney Creek Nation

Team

Todd Henderson

Gary Fleming

Matt Green

Amanda York

+

Anstie Construction

JMG

Rare Innovation

John Papworth

Southern Lighting

Through fire and water

Design within this partially burnt timber framework proved the kind of constraint that conjured innovation. As an ambitious adaptive reuse project, it involved a commitment to preserve the building’s integrity and ideate with sensitivity to the original fabric. The existing framework gave us a richer narrative territory than new features ever could.

Our design delved into the post-fire regeneration seen in the Australian bush, known to produce vibrant new plant life. We opted for tactile finishes that yearned to be touched. Textural paintwork in deep reds and greens matched raw edged interiors. For the immersive bathrooms, we surprised guests with pinks, greens, elevated ceilings and playful lighting.

Something old, something new

With such an unassuming, utilitarian exterior, we invited guests to engage and explore their offbeat suite from the moment they opened the door.

Flickers into the mill’s past include surviving elements like weathered corrugated iron, heritage sandstone and giant oregon trusses. To focus on these interesting signs of age, we reused original materials wherever possible.

Consistent with the local, seasonal focus of the restaurant below, we celebrated the strength of Tasmanian products and designers. Guests sink into custom made A.H Beard beds and bespoke furniture designed and made by Simon Ancher at his nearby Launceston studio.

Looking back

It feels good to reflect on how we managed to fit seven suites into the 3D jigsaw puzzle of the flour mill. And as always, we learned along the way. It was surprising how impactful the rooms with the smaller windows were. We thought they might feel too dark, but the lower light actually created a sense of intimacy, really drawing you to the view. It’s a humbling experience to work with a great client and builder towards a shared goal and give new life to a significant part of local history.